proofreadingbooks

proofreadingbooks:

The literature: emilystjohnmandel's STATION ELEVEN

The libation: After the collapse of civilization, what drink would you miss most? Surely you can scavenge plenty of wine and whiskey that’s kept perfect well (and even aged nicely) in basements and pantries - you could even make yourself a hot toddy with it, warmed over the fire.

But just think - you’ll never drink an ice-cold beer again. Want some citrus to mix with the last of your vodka? Unless you’re in Florida or California, you’re SOL. After the ants get to the granulated sugar, you can’t even make simple syrup. Bloody Mary? Sure, if you’ve got the tomatoes, but where are you gonna find Worcestershire sauce?

Of course, it’s not all bad - there’s fresh fruit when you can get it, and preserves, once you’ve figured out how to can produce without giving everyone lead poisoning. You can set up a still, teach yourself to make beer and wine and liquor. But those tiny luxuries - bitters, liqueurs, ice in the middle of summer? They’ve gone for good.

So raise one final glass to our opulent age, before the flu comes. Pour an old-fashioned, while you still have a choice in whether or not to be. Moisten a sugar cube (it comes in cubes!) with 2-3 dashes of Angostura bitters (they still make that!) in the bottom of a glass. Stir till the sugar’s dissolved, and add 2oz good spicy rye and a laughably huge ice cube (ready whenever you are). Garnish with orange peel, imported just for you from the farthest corners of the country. Stir, inhale, enjoy.

Survival, as they say, is insufficient.

Photo © Punch

Mmm. Tastes like NBA Longlist.

melvillehouse
melvillehouse:

skylightbooks:

"Bradbury (in 1975) didn’t drive a car. But he was often out and about in L.A., browsing bookstores’ stacks, his bicycle propped just outside."

Proposed alternate captions:
"Ray Bradbury’s hatred of automobiles was only eclipsed by his hatred of pants.”
"Ray Bradbury, pictured doing him."
"Ray Bradbury, about to sneeze, clenches his mighty quads."
"Ray Bradbury, raising the bar on embarrassing one’s daughter in front of her prom date."
"Ray Bradbury, the human magnetic dress-up playset."

"Ray Bradbury: Because fuck you, I’m Ray Bradbury."

melvillehouse:

skylightbooks:

"Bradbury (in 1975) didn’t drive a car. But he was often out and about in L.A., browsing bookstores’ stacks, his bicycle propped just outside."

Proposed alternate captions:

"Ray Bradbury’s hatred of automobiles was only eclipsed by his hatred of pants.”

"Ray Bradbury, pictured doing him."

"Ray Bradbury, about to sneeze, clenches his mighty quads."

"Ray Bradbury, raising the bar on embarrassing one’s daughter in front of her prom date."

"Ray Bradbury, the human magnetic dress-up playset."

"Ray Bradbury: Because fuck you, I’m Ray Bradbury."

dudeinpublishing

THE-TOAST & BUZZFEED TONIGHT AT BELL HOUSE

dudeinpublishing:

I know that sounds like I just picked things publishing people like out of a jar and then strung together, but it’s actually a thing and finally happening! Looking plenty forward to seeing a fair bit of you guys tonight. Dispatches TK.

image

YO, I WILL BE THERE. If you haven’t met me IRL, come find me - look for short red hair, a chambray shirt, and a big ol’ grin.

randomhouse
randomhouse:

Over at Everyday eBook, we interviewed Tana French about her latest novel, The Secret Place. We didn’t have room for this amazing outtake question, so you, sweet Tumblrers, get to read it first!

EH: One of the things I really loved about The Secret Place and one of the things I don’t see in adult fiction is how seriously it takes the inner lives and the friendships and the relationships among teenage girls. Is that something that you thought needed more representation? And how did you tap into that mindset?
TF: I think teenagers’ lives are really important. You’re dealing with who you are, what you consider important, you’re floundering through all the things that are thrown at you to try to find out your identity, your priorities, what’s the bedrock on which you’re going to build your life. And that’s going to have implications for the whole rest of your life, and I think that does deserve to be taken really, really seriously.
Also the friendships you make as a teenager – and I think this definitely comes out in the book – these friendships last for life and they define who you are. I still have friends from when I was a teenager who, even if I haven’t talked to them in years, we instantly click back to being friends. Because these people know you at your most messed up and confused and silly and ridiculous, and they love you with all that, and there’s nothing that can really change that. No matter who you grow up into, that foundation remains the same, and that’s hugely important.
There’s a scene in The Secret Place where Holly’s mother comes back from having met up with one of her old friends who she’s been out of touch with for decades, and is dizzied by it. She’s completely lightheaded and spinning with the way this friendship is still in place. And the person she was then is still in place after all these years, and it’s impossible to overstate the importance of that, and of those friendships that are in the process of being made when you’re a teenager and that will make you who you are. You find out who you are through these friendships. So yeah, I think that deserves to be taken really, really seriously.
Getting into the mindset was partly just remembering what it was like being a teenager. The bit that’s hardest, that does slip through your fingers – even though at the time you swear it won’t – is the intensity of it, the fever pitch that everything runs at. Everything matters. Everything is either the end of the world, or the transformation of the world, everything just matters so much. That can be hard to remember, because you’re in your thirties, you can’t live at that pitch any more, and it’s hard to remember that you used to live at it all the time.
The other thing that took a bit of work was the slang, because it’s changed in the last twenty years – nobody’s talking the way we used to. So I spent a fair amount of time lurking on websites that are meant for Irish teenagers, or on Facebook accounts, or hanging out at bus stops as school was letting out, dodgily edging nearer to groups of teenage girls. I’m sure I looked like a total weirdo, but this is the thing – I doubt any of them ever noticed I was there. Because when you’re fifteen, a thirty-something-year-old woman doesn’t even exist. You’re not even on their radar – their own world is all that matters. I have kids, so if you’re pushing a buggy you’re just in a different universe, you’re just an obstacle on the footpath.


I got to interview Tana French and I managed to get through it without just fangirl-gushing all over here and she’s amazing and so cool and you should read the rest of the interview here!

randomhouse:

Over at Everyday eBook, we interviewed Tana French about her latest novel, The Secret Place. We didn’t have room for this amazing outtake question, so you, sweet Tumblrers, get to read it first!

EH: One of the things I really loved about The Secret Place and one of the things I don’t see in adult fiction is how seriously it takes the inner lives and the friendships and the relationships among teenage girls. Is that something that you thought needed more representation? And how did you tap into that mindset?

TF: I think teenagers’ lives are really important. You’re dealing with who you are, what you consider important, you’re floundering through all the things that are thrown at you to try to find out your identity, your priorities, what’s the bedrock on which you’re going to build your life. And that’s going to have implications for the whole rest of your life, and I think that does deserve to be taken really, really seriously.

Also the friendships you make as a teenager – and I think this definitely comes out in the book – these friendships last for life and they define who you are. I still have friends from when I was a teenager who, even if I haven’t talked to them in years, we instantly click back to being friends. Because these people know you at your most messed up and confused and silly and ridiculous, and they love you with all that, and there’s nothing that can really change that. No matter who you grow up into, that foundation remains the same, and that’s hugely important.

There’s a scene in The Secret Place where Holly’s mother comes back from having met up with one of her old friends who she’s been out of touch with for decades, and is dizzied by it. She’s completely lightheaded and spinning with the way this friendship is still in place. And the person she was then is still in place after all these years, and it’s impossible to overstate the importance of that, and of those friendships that are in the process of being made when you’re a teenager and that will make you who you are. You find out who you are through these friendships. So yeah, I think that deserves to be taken really, really seriously.

Getting into the mindset was partly just remembering what it was like being a teenager. The bit that’s hardest, that does slip through your fingers – even though at the time you swear it won’t – is the intensity of it, the fever pitch that everything runs at. Everything matters. Everything is either the end of the world, or the transformation of the world, everything just matters so much. That can be hard to remember, because you’re in your thirties, you can’t live at that pitch any more, and it’s hard to remember that you used to live at it all the time.

The other thing that took a bit of work was the slang, because it’s changed in the last twenty years – nobody’s talking the way we used to. So I spent a fair amount of time lurking on websites that are meant for Irish teenagers, or on Facebook accounts, or hanging out at bus stops as school was letting out, dodgily edging nearer to groups of teenage girls. I’m sure I looked like a total weirdo, but this is the thing – I doubt any of them ever noticed I was there. Because when you’re fifteen, a thirty-something-year-old woman doesn’t even exist. You’re not even on their radar – their own world is all that matters. I have kids, so if you’re pushing a buggy you’re just in a different universe, you’re just an obstacle on the footpath.

I got to interview Tana French and I managed to get through it without just fangirl-gushing all over here and she’s amazing and so cool and you should read the rest of the interview here!

books
books:

Save the date! Spread the word! And kick off the Brooklyn Book Festival and Bookends week with Tumblr, recommendedreading, penamerican, and buzzfeedbooks!
We’ll have Karl Ove Knausgård “My Struggle” Mad Libs with kickstarter at 8, dancing with DJ sammybananas at 9, and free drinks as long as they last.
Hope to see you there!

Guys. Knausgård Mad Libs. GUYS.

books:

Save the date! Spread the word! And kick off the Brooklyn Book Festival and Bookends week with Tumblr, recommendedreading, penamerican, and buzzfeedbooks!

We’ll have Karl Ove Knausgård “My Struggle” Mad Libs with kickstarter at 8, dancing with DJ sammybananas at 9, and free drinks as long as they last.

Hope to see you there!

Guys. Knausgård Mad Libs. GUYS.

proofreadingbooks

proofreadingbooks:

The literature: Yann Martel’s LIFE OF PI (requested by theinfinitespaceage)

The libation: Two cocktails do I present to you, dear reader, and you must choose the one which speaks to you of the existence of a higher, more refreshing power.

For the first, rim your vessel with sea salt. Fill about halfway with Sixpoint Bengali IPA, and top up with grapefruit juice. Stir gently and deliberately until the seemingly at-odds flavors meld together into a peaceful coexistence. You’ve left home. This is the Salty Tiger.

For the second, rim your vessel with kosher salt (the vessel is unchanged, the location is). Mix two parts grapefruit juice with one part blanco tequila with two parts tonic water. Add a dash of bitters and stir. You’re on dry land. This is the Salty Perro.

The same ingredients recombined can lead to such different outcomes, but we must each choose our own path. I leave it to you to decide.

Photo © Cook the Story and Serious Eats

Got a little cerebral.

proofreadingbooks

proofreadingbooks:

The literature: NECRONOMICON: THE TALES OF H.P. LOVECRAFT

The libation: On what would have been the author’s 124th birthday, we bring you something R’lyeh, e’speciallyeh delicious. Combine 2oz Kraken dark rum, 1oz elder(gods)flower liqueur, 1oz fresh lime juice (the green, sticky spawn of the stars), and a dash or two of Angostura bitters. Recite the incantation (Ph’nglui mglw’nafh Cthulhu R’lyeh wgah’nagl fhtagn) while shaking with ice. Serve in a rocks glass, garnish with a tentacle twist of lime.

Pair with a dinner of odori-don, if you’re feeling brave in the face of the indifferent universe. And please, summon the Great Old Ones responsibly.

Photo © Mike McCune

R’lyeh proud of this one.

proofreadingbooks

proofreadingbooks:

The literature: David Foster Wallace’s A SUPPOSEDLY FUN THING I’LL NEVER DO AGAIN

The libation: Absinthe. Mistakes were made.

We’re not serving you absinthe. We’re not serving anybody absinthe. We can’t even look at absinthe. We can’t even look at the color green. We’re going to serve ourselves a bacon, egg, and cheese, and go back to bed for a couple days.

Photo © jb

thesignaturething

thesignaturething:

booksandhotchocolate:

Book Nerd Problems | Buying Too Many Books

This was me when I went to the Darien library last week. I had one book on hold, so I thought I’ll just dash in and grab it. But then I decided to look at the recommendations table, and then the new release section, and the “Hot in YA” display… and within 10 minutes I had 6 books in my arm.

But it was ok! You know what? Because everything’s free at the library! Guys, go to the library! Learn how to place holds and renew books online and your life will be easy as pie!

And if you live anywhere close to Darien, I’m not kidding—that place is a fucking palace and all the librarians are angels sent down from book heaven. Nicest people on the planet and their books displays/tables are always on point.

Yo, darienlibrary, you got a big fan over here!

proofreadingbooks

proofreadingbooks:

The literature: Herman Melville’s BARTLEBY, THE SCRIVENER

The libation: Sir? Sir. Sir, please. Just a yes or no! It’s the easiest thing in the world! Do you want a drink or not? Hello?

Sir, this is trying my patience. If you’re not going to order I’m going to have to ask you to leave. Seriously. A beer, wine? A cocktail? We have excellent cocktails. Do you like whiskey? Gin? Absinthe? Do you like anything? I could crush up some SSRIs and sprinkle them on top - that might help.

[snaps fingers in front of face]

Okay, I can’t deal with this. Security!

I crack myself up.

proofreadingbooks

proofreadingbooks:

The literature: Jennifer Egan’s A VISIT FROM THE GOON SQUAD (requested by ladydei)

The libation: For this fragmented novel (or is it a cohesive collection of linked short stories), we’re serving you a deconstructed Bloody Mary (or is it another cocktail entirely?). Much like the book, it is exacting and requires your attention, but is ultimately rewarding.

Infuse 2oz good vodka with three (3) peppercorns overnight. Procure 1oz celery juice through whatever methods you must, but tell no one how you came by it. Juice a lime for a total of 3/4oz juice (no more, no less).

Run the rind of the lime around the rim of a martini glass and dip the glass in tomato salt (in the future we will all have pocket food dehydrators - go to town on some tomatoes and mix with salt to taste). Shake all the liquid ingredients with ice 23.5 times and pour. Garnish with gold flakes (optional but recommended).

Powerpoints at the ready? Good. Bottoms up.

Photo © Lemon Tree

My brain is in a weird place today.

proofreadingbooks

proofreadingbooks:

The literature: EL James’ FIFTY SHADES OF GREY

The libation: Have your cat o’ nine (cock)tails handy - we’re going in.

We know it’s your first time, so we won’t be too rough on you.

Yet.

We’re going to instruct you on how to make a Cherry Smash, so listen carefully. Muddle a few maraschino cherries at the bottom of a rocks glass. Don’t be shy, really get in there and go to town on them. Add ice, for the shock of it. In a cocktail shaker, shake 1oz Jack Daniels, 1oz cherry juice, 0.5oz amaretto, and 0.5oz ginger brandy (for spice). Pour over the ice and cherries, and then top with cherry cola (something something Lana Del Rey something) and stir.

In this Red Room, you’ll be feeling no pain.

Or, for those of you who’re a little more experienced, our friends over at learningmixology have suggested iced Earl Gray tea mixed with bruised peach simple syrup and bourbon, garnished with hand-slapped mint leaves. We’ll give that our spank of approval.

Photo © Tastebook

I’m so, so, so sorry.

proofreadingbooks

proofreadingbooks:

The literature: emmastraub's THE VACATIONERS

The libation: We here at Proof Reading firmly believe that no family vacation should be endured without the strategic application of some local liquor. And when in Mallorca, do as the Mallorcans do. Palo de Mallorca was initially brewed as an herbal curative for malaria in the 1600s, but as time went on, the islanders started adding alcohol and using it more for - well, let’s just call it self-medication.

Pour a small measure over ice and sip by the pool as your family works out their issues back in the hotel room - after all, you can only drink Palo on Mallorca, but your family is your family no matter where you go.

Doing the research for this blog is the coolest thing.