nprfreshair
nprfreshair:


From a book of photographs and essays about London by Chicago-based writer and photographer Brian Leli. Explaining the project on his website, Leli says:



From the end of one strange summer to the next, I walked around London looking for the closest thing I could find to the truth in any given moment. It didn’t feel great a lot of the time. But it feels a little better now.



via yatzer

nprfreshair:

From a book of photographs and essays about London by Chicago-based writer and photographer Brian Leli. Explaining the project on his website, Leli says:

From the end of one strange summer to the next, I walked around London looking for the closest thing I could find to the truth in any given moment. It didn’t feel great a lot of the time. But it feels a little better now.

via yatzer

You need to see London at night, particularly the theaters. But not just the night life. London itself looks best in the dark. It’s a pretty safe city, and you can walk in most places after sunset. It has a sedate and ghostly beauty. In the crepuscular kindness, you can see not just how she is, but how she once was, the layers of lives that have been lived here. Somebody with nothing better to do worked out that for every one of us living today, there are 15 ghosts. In most places you don’t notice them, but in London you do. The dead and the fictional ghosts of Sherlock Holmes and Falstaff, Oliver Twist, Wendy and the Lost Boys, all the kindly, garrulous ghosts that accompany you in the night. The river runs like dark silk through the heart of the city, and the bridges dance with light. There are corners of silence in the revelry of the West End and Soho, and in the inky shadows foxes and owls patrol Hyde Park, which is still illuminated by gaslight.

A Profile of London by A.A. Gill - NYTimes.com

You need to read this wonderful profile of London by A.A. Gill for the Times, which has made me so nostalgic for autumn 2007 and also incredibly wanderlusty.

queenofmultitasking

geekartgallery:

The Infinity Room by Yayoi Kusama

Showing at Tate Modern in London from February 9 to June 5, 2012, the Infinity Mirror Room is filled with constantly shifting LED lights and infinite fractal mirrors, imparting the feeling of floating in space. Created by Kusama, an 82-year-old woman who has spent most of the last forty years of her life as a voluntarily patient in a psychiatric hospital.

More on Kusama’s retrospective here.

thegoddessofthorns
hellodmitri:

Christopher Wren, A Plan of the City of London, 1666 engraving.

I’m so glad Christopher Wren’s planned Haussmannization of London post-Great Fire never came to fruition - it’s a city made of bizarre, illogical, twisty little streets, and I can’t imagine it any other way.

hellodmitri:

Christopher Wren, A Plan of the City of London, 1666 engraving.

I’m so glad Christopher Wren’s planned Haussmannization of London post-Great Fire never came to fruition - it’s a city made of bizarre, illogical, twisty little streets, and I can’t imagine it any other way.