thedailywhat
thedailywhat:

Pushing Daisies May Come Back From The Dead of the Day: It’s entirely possible that cult classic Pushing Daisies will receive a magic life-restoring touch — in the form of a stage adaptation. In an interview, Ellen Greene (AKA Aunt Vivian on the show) released this little ray of hope:
Actually, there’s been talk of a version of it — I’m not supposed to say anything! A possibility… A possibility of stage. I would love for Vivian to exist again.
Given that the show also starred Broadway legend Kristen Chenoweth, and featured a bold, over-the-top style, Pushing Daisies would naturally lend itself to becoming a musical — and we might even get to find out how it ends.
[mtvgeek]

GASP.But if it doesn’t have the original cast, I’m not interested.

thedailywhat:

Pushing Daisies May Come Back From The Dead of the Day: It’s entirely possible that cult classic Pushing Daisies will receive a magic life-restoring touch — in the form of a stage adaptation. In an interview, Ellen Greene (AKA Aunt Vivian on the show) released this little ray of hope:

Actually, there’s been talk of a version of it — I’m not supposed to say anything! A possibility… A possibility of stage. I would love for Vivian to exist again.

Given that the show also starred Broadway legend Kristen Chenoweth, and featured a bold, over-the-top style, Pushing Daisies would naturally lend itself to becoming a musical — and we might even get to find out how it ends.

[mtvgeek]

GASP.
But if it doesn’t have the original cast, I’m not interested.

wk12

wk12:

Maurice Sendak died on Tuesday. 

He left behind a world of wild things, little bears, goblins, and mysterious night kitchens

Yesterday, Riswold asked us to create a fitting send-off for Sendak.

We decided to go back to the world he created for us. We painted the walls, cut up everything we could get our hands on, and made a total mess of the 12 space (sorry, Jinnina).

Sixteen hours later, we’d recreated one of Sendak’s most iconic settings. And in the spirit of his work, we made it so everyone could be part of that world.

It’s a bittersweet goodbye, but it’s the least we could do for the man who inspired us to forever be wild things.

shorterexcerpts

What Kind of Times Are These

By Adrienne Rich


There’s a place between two stands of trees where the grass grows uphill
and the old revolutionary road breaks off into shadows
near a meeting-house abandoned by the persecuted
who disappeared into those shadows.


I’ve walked there picking mushrooms at the edge of dread, but don’t be fooled
this isn’t a Russian poem, this is not somewhere else but here,
our country moving closer to its own truth and dread,
its own ways of making people disappear.


I won’t tell you where the place is, the dark mesh of the woods
meeting the unmarked strip of light—
ghost-ridden crossroads, leafmold paradise:
I know already who wants to buy it, sell it, make it disappear.


And I won’t tell you where it is, so why do I tell you
anything? Because you still listen, because in times like these
to have you listen at all, it’s necessary
to talk about trees.

newyorker
newyorker:

Postscript: Adrienne Rich, 1929-2012

The ringing, defiant poetry of Adrienne Rich, who died yesterday at eighty-two, articulated the frustrations of women who came of age along clipped paths in the nineteen-forties and fifties, only to discover in the sixties and seventies the extent of their longing to tear up the grass. Her voice resounds, three generations on. From her 1963 poem “Snapshots of a Daughter-in-Law,” a modernist collage in which careless references to women’s lives from Horace, Diderot, Eliot, and Shakespeare are recast in tight, furious stanzas about domestic confinement (“Dolce ridens, dulce loquens / she shaves her legs until they gleam / like petrified mammoth-tusk) to her expansive later poems that elaborate the love between two women, Rich continually stretched categories of feminine identity. She was an explorer, “diving into the wreck,” as the title of one of her most famous poems has it, to help us find what is naked and unencumbered in ourselves: “the wreck and not the story of the wreck / the thing itself and not the myth.”
We’ve gathered here seven of the twenty-eight poems by Rich published in this magazine between 1953 and 1958. In these early poems, we see the formal discipline and metric grace that Rich would maintain (and push against) throughout her long career. This is decorous verse becoming rude: the anger to which Rich would give such powerful voice bubbles beneath the taut surfaces of these fine poems.
“England and Always” (1953)
“The Marriage Portion” (1953)
“Holiday” (1953)
“Living in Sin” (1954)
“At the Jewish New Year” (1956)
“Moving Inland” (1957)
“The Survivors” (1957)

Photograph by Neal Boenzi/New York Times/Getty Images.

newyorker:

Postscript: Adrienne Rich, 1929-2012

The ringing, defiant poetry of Adrienne Rich, who died yesterday at eighty-two, articulated the frustrations of women who came of age along clipped paths in the nineteen-forties and fifties, only to discover in the sixties and seventies the extent of their longing to tear up the grass. Her voice resounds, three generations on. From her 1963 poem “Snapshots of a Daughter-in-Law,” a modernist collage in which careless references to women’s lives from Horace, Diderot, Eliot, and Shakespeare are recast in tight, furious stanzas about domestic confinement (“Dolce ridens, dulce loquens / she shaves her legs until they gleam / like petrified mammoth-tusk) to her expansive later poems that elaborate the love between two women, Rich continually stretched categories of feminine identity. She was an explorer, “diving into the wreck,” as the title of one of her most famous poems has it, to help us find what is naked and unencumbered in ourselves: “the wreck and not the story of the wreck / the thing itself and not the myth.”

We’ve gathered here seven of the twenty-eight poems by Rich published in this magazine between 1953 and 1958. In these early poems, we see the formal discipline and metric grace that Rich would maintain (and push against) throughout her long career. This is decorous verse becoming rude: the anger to which Rich would give such powerful voice bubbles beneath the taut surfaces of these fine poems.

England and Always” (1953)

The Marriage Portion” (1953)

Holiday” (1953)

Living in Sin” (1954)

At the Jewish New Year” (1956)

Moving Inland” (1957)

The Survivors” (1957)

Photograph by Neal Boenzi/New York Times/Getty Images.

The work was beautiful, I think, because Winehouse was extremely smart about how risk works when you’re making art. She understood that the steely, arm’s-length confidence of modern pop singers — the ones who command, demand, and let you know how little shit they take — can only get you so far. You can’t really exhibit grace or toughness without having something hanging over you; it’s like weightlifting without the weights. So the most “retro” thing about Back to Black turned out not to be its period styling or vintage detail, but that streak of woeful resignation borrowed from old jazz records. Even more anachronistic, Winehouse realized that you can’t write love songs about yourself. Her version of love seemed to be the reckless, hopeless, masochistic kind, the one that looks exactly like drug addiction. There are songs of hers where it sounds as if happiness, or its nearest approximation, has come to depend mostly on the presence of a given man and a stiff drink.

The great thing she understood, though, is that there are ways of telegraphing grace, poise, and wit through all of that — that you can fatalistically accept all varieties of badness and still communicate a level of life and clarity that amazes people. Life, in these songs, sounds like a bit of a mess, but the character singing them does not. Since Winehouse’s success, the U.K. has been full of young women singing backward-looking soul, but it’s her clear-eyed vision through weariness and anguish, not the actual sound, that Winehouse is handing down to them. This year, Adele’s second album outsold Winehouse’s by tacking that same mien onto a safer, more ordinary topic — a standard-issue breakup — helped along by some people’s unconscious, and incredibly condescending, assumption that it must be very sad and tragic for her not to be skinny.
shorterexcerpts
Addiction is a serious disease; it will end with jail, mental institutions or death. I was 27 years old when through the friendship and help of Chip Somers of the treatment centre Focus 12 I found recovery. Through Focus I was introduced to support fellowships for alcoholics and drug addicts that are very easy to find and open to anybody with a desire to stop drinking and without which I would not be alive.

Now Amy Winehouse is dead, like many others whose unnecessary deaths have been retrospectively romanticised, at 27 years old. Whether this tragedy was preventable or not is now irrelevant. It is not preventable today. We have lost a beautiful and talented woman to this disease. Not all addicts have Amy’s incredible talent. Or Kurt’s or Jimi’s or Janis’s. Some people just get the affliction. All we can do is adapt the way we view this condition, not as a crime or a romantic affectation but as a disease that will kill.

We need to review the way society treats addicts, not as criminals but as sick people in need of care. We need to look at the way our government funds rehabilitation. It is cheaper to rehabilitate an addict than to send them to prison, so criminalisation doesn’t even make economic sense. Not all of us know someone with the incredible talent that Amy had but we all know drunks and junkies and they all need help and the help is out there. All they have to do is pick up the phone and make the call. Or not. Either way, there will be a phone call.

Russell Brand on Amy Winehouse: ‘We have lost a beautiful, talented woman’

Cosigned. I have known and loved many addicts and it is a bastard of a disease. Those who have beaten it should be proud; those who can’t beat it deserve love, help and encouragement, not pity, scorn or jail.

(via clembastow)

sweptawaybydanger
Who says that I am dead knows nought at all
I - am that is
Two mice within Redwall
The Warrior sleeps ‘twixt hall and Cavern Hole
I - am that is
Take on my mighty role
Look for the sword in moonlight streaming forth
At night, when day’s first hour reflects the north
From o’er the threshold, seek and you will see
I - am that is
My sword will wield for me.

Riddle below Martin the Warrior’s tapestry - Redwall, 1986 (via cerinus-rivennis-apodemus)

I - am that is - Matthias